A salute to the former devs of two discontinued Arch-based distros

I apologise in advance for my sentimental tone in this article but the month December does that to me. I love December, not only because of the coming holidays heralded by the Christmas lights in the streets or that I’m nearing my birthday, no it is this feeling of bringing a year to a close.

I’m convinced that everybody encounters this feeling somewhere in this month and I do hope that, like me, you highlight your positive achievements and the learning moments from the negative or even sad moments you’ve encountered this year for yourself.

In the wake of my sentimental mood, I’m writing this article to honour the devs of two discontinued Arch distros.

Balancing act

Arch land has its fair share of Arch-based distros and most of them are driven by enthusiastic Arch users that want to give other users the opportunity to discover the wondrous world of Arch.

I know now that developing and maintaining a distro is a continuous struggle between passion, responsibilities and home life. You have to perform a challenging balancing act to tread that unforgiving cord you both dread and love to walk on.

Sometimes the balance is too hard to keep and when you don’t want to pull everything down with you in a possible fall, you simply drop some load to refind your balance.

This is what the devs of two discontinued Arch-based distros did and no matter how hard the decision was for them, life is all about keeping in balance.

Condres OS

This Italian based distro was inspired on the work of Apricity that was discontinued after two stable releases in 2017.

Like Apricity, Condres OS was aiming at users looking for the convenience of built-in cloud accessibility. This resulted in a computing workspace that was both elegant and productive.

They used the Calamares installer and offered nine flavours: Xfce, Mate, Plasma, Cinnamon, Gnome, Gnome-Apricity relives, an educational edition, a server edition and a 32-bit edition.

In October 2019 they announced the end of the project simply because they couldn’t combine the workload with their day to day life anymore.

Antergos

I think it’s not a big surprise that this one made this article, without its existence EndeavourOS never saw the light of day.

Antergos, or mama, began as a summer project that evolved in Cinnarch on May 7th 2012. As the name suggested the team offered an OS with Cinnamon as their only DE.

On May 12th 2013 the project changed the name into Antergos, due to problems they encountered maintaining Cinnamon, they switched to Gnome as their flagship DE, that also booted as their live environment.

That was not the only change that came with Antergos, they introduced an elegant and modern looking graphical installer called Cnchi with six choices of DE, later they added more DEs.

You either loved or hated Cnchi but it was the main feature that made Antergos what it was and with its friendly installer they aimed at almost every Linux user who wanted to give Arch a try.

Due to their busy lives Alexandre Filgueira, Gastau Castells and Dustin Falgout said goodbye to us on May 21st 2019 after a successful seven-year run.

Legacy

It is always sad to hear when a distro bites the dust but the legacy of those distros echo through the entire Linux community. Every single community member that distro had, learned from them in their Linux experience. Most people move on to another distro but never forget the experience Condres or Antergos had brought them whilst using another distro.

Then there are those amongst us who are too set in their ways and start a new distro with the knowledge either one of those distros brought them… (What sort of person does that?!?)

Either way, this is the legacy those developers left behind, they touched and inspired many people and that’s why I think they deserve special recognition for it.

To all the former devs of Antergos, Condres OS or any discontinued distro:

Thank you for everything you’ve done for the Linux community, you’re valuable efforts gave a lot of users the confidence and enthusiasm to run Linux.

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